Monday, March 25, 2013

What Is Pokemon TCG?

Hey!

It's Tyler again, and today I'm hopefully going to clear up some false beliefs about WHAT exactly the Pokemon TCG (Trading Card Game) is, and what the differences are among the TCG, the video games, and the TV show. As always, feel free to leave a comment with any questions you might have after reading.
Never thought I would use this pic in a post. . .


So, as most of you already know, Pokemon is all about Ash Ketchum and his beloved Pikachu. . .


If there is one thing that should be clear, It's that Pokemon the TV show actually is about Pikachu and Ash and friends, and is overall geared towards kids ages ten and under. The Pokemon video games and the trading card game, are things of their own. In the video game, players capture Pokemon, level them up, and battle and defeat CPUs in-game, to progress through the game. Along the way, they can  battle against friends via WiFi or locally. To battle (or fight) in the Pokemon video games, two players each start with a team of six different Pokemon all with unique attributes, like in the card game, each Pokemon may have an Ability alongside four moves that Pokemon can "learn". The winner is decided when a player successfully KOs all six of his/her opponents Pokemon using their Pokemon's attacks and or Abilities.

The third version of Pokemon, the Trading Card Game, is not at all associated with the TV show the games, but it was originally based on the games. In the video games, to battle (or fight), two players each start with a team of six different Pokemon all with unique attributes, like in the card game, each Pokemon may have an Ability, alongside four moves that Pokemon can "learn". The winner is decided when a player successfully KOs all six of his/her opponents Pokemon using their Pokemon's attacks and or Abilities.

The TCG, like in the video game, has a requirement of one Active Pokemon (the only Pokemon you can attack with), and five Bench Pokemon (Pokemon that can replace the Active Pokemon once it is KOed), a total of six Pokemon. Similarly to the video games, in the TCG, when one player knocks out 6 of their opponents Pokemon, they win. For more on how to play the game and the exact rules, check out Pokemon TCG Rules.

To get started, I will provide some common questions and answers anyone may have about Pokemon TCG's values and expectations in tournaments and while playing. Again, if any of your questions are not listed here, feel free to leave a comment in the comments section under the post.

Question #1: Are Pokemon tournaments and events a safe place for my children/child?

Question #2: Is there an Official Code of Conduct or a some Etiquette players should know for Pokemon TCG for tournaments and events? And if there is, what is it? 


Answer:

Spirit of the Game

As a game of skill, the Pokémon TCG is enjoyed for its complex strategies, entertaining characters, and atmosphere of friendly competition. While the objective of a Pokémon TCG tournament is to determine the skill level of each player involved, our ultimate goal is to ensure that every participant has fun. It is this attitude that Play! Pokémon wishes to emphasize during Pokémon TCG events.
Regardless of the size of the prizes on the line, adherence to the Spirit of the Game helps to ensure that all participants, including players, spectators, and event staff at a Pokémon TCG event, have an enjoyable experience. This spirit should guide the conduct of players as well as the tournament judges as they interpret and enforce the rules.
The Spirit of the Game is composed of the following tenets:
  • Fun: The Pokémon TCG is a game, and games are meant to be fun for all parties involved. When a game ceases to be fun, players find other things to do.
  • Fairness: Games cease to be fun when players break the rules to achieve victory. A player should prefer to lose a game than to win by cheating.
  • Honesty: Players of any game should strive to act honestly while playing that game. If a player inadvertently breaks a rule during a game and becomes aware of the error before his or her opponent or a judge, that player should make the opponent and the judge aware of the misplay.
  • Respect: Players, spectators, and staff should be treated with the same respect that players would expect for themselves. Distracting an opponent or a judge to gain advantage shows disrespect to everyone involved in a Pokémon TCG event.
  • Sportsmanship: Winning or losing with grace is vital to the enjoyment of a game. The desire to continue playing a game can be soured by players that berate their opponents after winning or losing a match.
  • Learning: Players should strive to help each other increase their Pokémon TCG play skills. It is not a player's responsibility to make his or her opponent's plays for that opponent. However, discussing strategies, offering deck tips, or constructively critiquing game play decisions after the match has been completed helps both participants to become better players.***

Hopefully, I've answered most of your questions here, but if not, as always, I'm ALWAYS open to comments or questions so feel free to leave one (or two).

Overall, The Pokemon TCG is a fun and exciting game that is enjoyable for kids and adults of all ages. If you still think Pokemon TCG is boring and a waste of time, try it out, you might be surprised. Until next time.

 -Tyler














*** "Spirit of the Game" taken from http://www.pokemon.com/us/play-pokemon/about/

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